Koskela | Ngalya Collection

 

As a celebration of a ten-year collaborative partnership, Koskela has launched the Ngayla collection with Bula'Bula Arts, Durrmu Arts, Milingimbi Art and Culture, Moa Arts, Ngarrindjeri Weavers, and Tjanpi Desert Weavers. 

Words: Emma-Kate Wilson

 
2019 marks 10 years since Koskela began working with Indigenous artists. Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

2019 marks 10 years since Koskela began working with Indigenous artists. Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

Co-founders Russel Koskela and Sasha Titchkosky in the  Koskela  showroom. Photo - Courtesy of Koskela.

Co-founders Russel Koskela and Sasha Titchkosky in the Koskela showroom. Photo - Courtesy of Koskela.

 

The luminous collection will appear at the Roseberry store until 18th September before it travels to 'Tarnanthi' 2019 at the Art Gallery of South Australia as part of the iconic Aboriginal and Torres Straits Contemporary Art Festival.

The Ngayla/Together collection is produced as a functional contemporary lighting range. However, the uniqueness of each of these products means the pieces have the duality of an art form, even when not illuminated. 

Each of the art centres brings the individuality of country ranging far across Australia in Ramingining; Peppimenarti, Yurrwi; Mua Island; Ngaanyatjarra, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara lands; and The Coorong – travelling thousands of kilometres to reach the Koskela warehouse. 

 
Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

 

Mavis Ganambarr, cultural figure and artist on Elcho Island, has "been instrumental in the success and the longevity of the projects," shares Titchkosy. Koskela, in discussion with Ganambarr, created a standardised structure that allows the artist to weave and design their creativity on to the frame. Over ten years, Titchkosky shares it's been amazing to see the progression and the level of experimentation that's developed – from new colour palettes to different stitches.

Designers have the most amazing opportunity to influence so many different aspects of how we live our lives, I think by virtue of the products that they create or how they’re actually produced.
— Sasha Titchkosky, Co-founder at Koskela
 
The  Koskela  Rosebery Store, a 2000m2 100-year-old warehouse in Rosebery, Sydney. Photo - Courtesy of Koskela.

The Koskela Rosebery Store, a 2000m2 100-year-old warehouse in Rosebery, Sydney. Photo - Courtesy of Koskela.

 

The Tjanpi Deserts Weavers say this has been one of the most rewarding factors of working with Koskela, being able to experiment and learn new forms of art-making. It also connects the heritage of their culture and remembering and teaching the ways of the 'Early Days.’ Tjanpi have collected emu feathers and plant materials from the bush and dyed raffia to include elements of place, to connect the objects to country.

The more we can engage people in one way or another with our Indigenous heritage, I think the better, and there are lots of different ways we can do that.
— Sasha Titchkosky
 
Lights by Tili Wiru and Koskela. Photo - Courtesy of Koskela.

Lights by Tili Wiru and Koskela. Photo - Courtesy of Koskela.

Artist Nancy Nanana Jackson from Tjanpi Desert Weavers. Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

Artist Nancy Nanana Jackson from Tjanpi Desert Weavers. Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

 

The objects are not only carefully crafted by each artist but also the environment. They are a product of their surroundings, each woven piece grown and harvested from Country. 

The preservation of the environment is essential to preserving these art centres and their cultural objects. Titchkosky shares, climate change "will have a big impact on these art communities." She adds, to reverse the effects, "it requires a huge amount of power and kind of real leadership at every level of government."

 
All the products in  Ngalya  have been crafted ‘on country’ (meaning the site of each artist’s ancestral land and place of residence) using locally harvested plant fibres and natural, handmade dyes. Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

All the products in Ngalya have been crafted ‘on country’ (meaning the site of each artist’s ancestral land and place of residence) using locally harvested plant fibres and natural, handmade dyes. Photo - Rhett Hammerton.

The  Koskela  Rosebery Store, a 2000m2 100-year-old warehouse in Rosebery, Sydney. Photo - Courtesy of Koskela.

The Koskela Rosebery Store, a 2000m2 100-year-old warehouse in Rosebery, Sydney. Photo - Courtesy of Koskela.

 
The wirra/piti bowl shape is important for Yarnangu/Anangu because wirra/piti were used for many daily tasks in the early days (pre-European contact) … it is important to remember these early days and respect them.
— Tjanpi Desert Weavers
 
 

Ngalya
Wednesday August 28th – Wednesday September 18th
Koskela
1/85 Dunning Ave
Rosebery NSW